Bjork Brings It

Björk ‘Notget’ VR Teaser from Analog on Vimeo.

On 3 June 2016 Björk debuted Björk Digital, a virtual reality exhibit showcasing all the VR videos completed for Vulnicura thus far, including the world premiere of “Notget”, directed by Warren du Preez and Nick Thornton Jones, at Carriageworks for Vivid Sydney 2016 in Sydney, Australia. She DJ’d the opening night party [98] and did the same when the show traveled to Tokyo, Japan on 29 June,[99] showing at Miraikan. During the Miraikan residency, Björk made history by featuring in the world’s first ever virtual reality live stream broadcast on YouTube. She gave a live performance of Vulnicura’s final song “Quicksand”, and the footage will be incorporated into the “Quicksand” VR experience to be released at a later date. Björk Digital is expected to tour the globe for 18 months with its next stop in Montreal. source: Wikipedia

via VOX:
You know you’re in for a good rant when the person delivering said rant opens with “dear little miss media.”

And when the ranter is Björk, well, buckle up.

On December 16, during a highly anticipated appearance at Houston’s second annual Day for Night music festival, the Nordic singer revealed Björk Digital, a five-room installation where attendees could walk through an art exhibit, immerse themselves in a virtual reality version of “intense footage captured from inside [Bjork’s] mouth,” and listen to a music set programmed and deejayed by the artist herself.

The scene, which saw Björk wearing a mask and deejaying from behind a screen of foliage, drew a mix of responses, ranging from positive to negative to “WTF?” from both audiences and music critics (“The crowd remained rapt and respectful but didn’t always seem to know what to do,” hedged Joey Guerra at the Houston Chronicle). And many of the negative responses also seemed baffled: Why was Bjork obscured behind so many ferns? Why didn’t she perform her own music? Was that even her behind the mask?

Björk had a few things to say in response. In a Facebook post on December 21 (as well as a shorter post on Instagram), the singer used her most recent reviews as a jumping-off point to speak out against gender biases in the music industry (as she’s occasionally done in the past). Björk dismissed critics’ flummoxed response to her DJ set, arguing that they’d held her to a different standard than male artists performing similarly experimental work

Classic from 2011:

björk – crystalline from Björk on Vimeo.

Bjork web | Bjork’s superb youtube channel

Guardian interview provides good context

Roach Burn

Steve Roach is a central figure on my own music. Between the support of Projekt, his own web site, and Bandcamp, the innovative ambient composer, player, producer, is–somehow–able to create lots of new music every year. His Bandcamp releases may be previewed in full at Bandcamp.

Pauline Oliveros 1932-2016

With respect to my own musical background, and so with regard for my own influences, Pauline Oliveros stood with Thelonious Monk as the second-to-none inspirations for my music. Although it is crucial to fold in the handful of other critical influences, the odd couple of Monk and Oliveros key the two driving principles, Oliveros’s deep listening, and, Monk’s absolute improv.

The first Deep listening Band record changed my musical life.


About Pauline Oliveros | NYT Obituary

Deep listening Institute

Deep Listening Institute (DLI) promotes the music and Deep Listening practice of pioneer composer Pauline Oliveros, providing a unique approach to music, literature, art, meditation, technology and healing. DLI fosters creative innovation across boundaries and across abilities, among artists and audience, musicians and non-musicians, healers and the physically or cognitively challenged, and children of all ages. This ever-growing community of musicians, artists, scientists and certified Deep Listening practitioners strives for a heightened consciousness of the world of sound and the sound of the world.

Tom Service’s Guide to the Music of Pauline Oliveros (2012) Guardian UK

Peter Kirn – performance and the space, time, sound continuum

A Festival to Ponder the Nature of Time

From Create Digital Music, and right up my alley; although nowadays I am more observer than participant. Right up yours too if you are concerned at all with future music, performance, experimentation, field recordings, and the integration of sound with other modes and domains.

What Sussan Deyhim Is Up To

(Film by Eric Minh Swenson) Dawn of the Cold Season refers directly to Forough Farrokhzad’s collections of poems “Let us Believe in the Beginning of the Cold Season” 1974, one of the most discussed books of original writing by an Iranian literary figure. This poem is the poet’s brave admission that she has passed on from the vibrancy, beauty and joy of youth and is inescapably deteriorating into old age.

Sussan Deyhim, the Iranian-American artist (in music, word, and image,) remains vital.

Ancient soul music.

Herbie Tsoaeli, In the Spirit of Johnny Dyani

herbi-tsoaeli


with Zim “Zimology” Ngqawana

There is a web site called Africanjazz. I had never visited it because I didn’t know it was ‘out there.’ But, as often happens when I am in my emusic account and dealing with the chaotic sprawl of its offerings looking to bring some new music into my world, I leaned into Google, and, discovered a page of brand new recommendations at AfricanJazz about jazz from South Africa.

There I discovered bassist Herbie Tsoaeli‘s new recording African Time Quartet in Concert (Live.) Went back to emusic and downloaded it. It is a strong statement of the people’s music, as Abdullah Ibrahim would call it.

iTunes link

I had seen Tsoaeli’s name on recordings by SA greats Zim Ngqawana and Winston Mankunku Ngozi, but I had not noted a year ago that his debut recording African Time had been named the South African Jazz Record of the Year for 2013.

https://soundcloud.com/city-press/herbie-tsoaeli-quartet

Herbie Tsoaeli Facebook

Nduduzo Makhathini‘s new, superb recording of solo piano is titled Mother Tongue.

South African Jazz on the web;
music.org.za
jazzE Magazine

Legendary bassist Johnny Dyani, who notably played with The Blue Notes and Abdullah Ibrahim, was, stature-wise, his continent’s Charles Mingus. This post remembers with fondness the flame of Dyani fervor that inflected my musical friends during the Vermont years. You know who you are.

Brian Eno Has a Year

highlife

Brian Eno & Karl Hyde – High Life at Warp Records

Brian Eno wins Giga-Hertz Award for contribution to electronic music
Producer and musician takes home €10,000 for his lifetime of ‘musical transgression’ at prestigious ceremony

Brian Eno Net

Brian Eno Tagged on Soundcloud

Brian Eno Music on Facebook

Eno & Hyde’s High Life is, for me, one of the highlight’s of the year in electronic and experimental music. Obviously the recording contains a bounty of wonderful sound, yet what really brightened my appreciation was learning that the duo made the record in five intense days of dedicated collaborative experimentation.

This reminds me of how I work. Although Eno is more a spiritual influence over thirty years rather than a direct sonic influence, some of the rough experiments for my next records are somewhat Eno-esque in their being unfinicky, ambient, experimental outputs.

The Yaybahar

I want one. I’d settle for spending sometime in the room it’s in.

via VIMEO: Yaybahar is an electric-free, totally acoustic instrument designed by Gorkem Sen. The vibrations from the strings are transmitted via the coiled springs to the frame drums. These vibrations are turned into sound by the membranes which echo back and forth on the coiled springs. This results in an unique listening experience with an hypnotic surround sound. What you hear in this performance is captured in realtime without any additional effects and with no post audio processing.

Credits
————-
Instrument: Yaybahar
Performence: Görkem Sen
Video: Levent Bozkurt
Video Editing: Olgu Demir
Sound Mix: Mert Aksuna
Place: Ali?ler Yurdu
2014

Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/gorkemsen

Gear Lust 2

roger-linn

Interview.

linnstrument

Roger Linn Design

Linnstrument

The promise of synthesis was to produce any instrument sound you can imagine. However, if you’ve ever tried to play a convincing guitar, sax, violin, clarinet or cello solo on a MIDI keyboard, you’ve found it to sound static and lifeless because keyboards can’t do much more than turn sounds on and off at different volumes. LinnStrument takes a new approach, capturing each finger’s subtle movements in three dimensions for simultaneous fine control of note expression, pitch and timbre. With this level of expressive control, the promise of synthesis is finally a reality.

Youtube Videos of Linnstrument – very high WOW! factor