Bjork Brings It

Björk ‘Notget’ VR Teaser from Analog on Vimeo.

On 3 June 2016 Björk debuted Björk Digital, a virtual reality exhibit showcasing all the VR videos completed for Vulnicura thus far, including the world premiere of “Notget”, directed by Warren du Preez and Nick Thornton Jones, at Carriageworks for Vivid Sydney 2016 in Sydney, Australia. She DJ’d the opening night party [98] and did the same when the show traveled to Tokyo, Japan on 29 June,[99] showing at Miraikan. During the Miraikan residency, Björk made history by featuring in the world’s first ever virtual reality live stream broadcast on YouTube. She gave a live performance of Vulnicura’s final song “Quicksand”, and the footage will be incorporated into the “Quicksand” VR experience to be released at a later date. Björk Digital is expected to tour the globe for 18 months with its next stop in Montreal. source: Wikipedia

via VOX:
You know you’re in for a good rant when the person delivering said rant opens with “dear little miss media.”

And when the ranter is Björk, well, buckle up.

On December 16, during a highly anticipated appearance at Houston’s second annual Day for Night music festival, the Nordic singer revealed Björk Digital, a five-room installation where attendees could walk through an art exhibit, immerse themselves in a virtual reality version of “intense footage captured from inside [Bjork’s] mouth,” and listen to a music set programmed and deejayed by the artist herself.

The scene, which saw Björk wearing a mask and deejaying from behind a screen of foliage, drew a mix of responses, ranging from positive to negative to “WTF?” from both audiences and music critics (“The crowd remained rapt and respectful but didn’t always seem to know what to do,” hedged Joey Guerra at the Houston Chronicle). And many of the negative responses also seemed baffled: Why was Bjork obscured behind so many ferns? Why didn’t she perform her own music? Was that even her behind the mask?

Björk had a few things to say in response. In a Facebook post on December 21 (as well as a shorter post on Instagram), the singer used her most recent reviews as a jumping-off point to speak out against gender biases in the music industry (as she’s occasionally done in the past). Björk dismissed critics’ flummoxed response to her DJ set, arguing that they’d held her to a different standard than male artists performing similarly experimental work

Classic from 2011:

björk – crystalline from Björk on Vimeo.

Bjork web | Bjork’s superb youtube channel

Guardian interview provides good context

Roach Burn

Steve Roach is a central figure on my own music. Between the support of Projekt, his own web site, and Bandcamp, the innovative ambient composer, player, producer, is–somehow–able to create lots of new music every year. His Bandcamp releases may be previewed in full at Bandcamp.

MIDI Couture

Ensemble Topogràfic (Anna Hierro and Carlos Martorell) make use of an armband controller. Her arm positions are sent via Bluetooth LE to an iPad controlling granular synths. Aleatoric elements, along with improvisation, mean the piece won’t be the same twice.

h/t Synthtopia

Pauline Oliveros 1932-2016

With respect to my own musical background, and so with regard for my own influences, Pauline Oliveros stood with Thelonious Monk as the second-to-none inspirations for my music. Although it is crucial to fold in the handful of other critical influences, the odd couple of Monk and Oliveros key the two driving principles, Oliveros’s deep listening, and, Monk’s absolute improv.

The first Deep listening Band record changed my musical life.


About Pauline Oliveros | NYT Obituary

Deep listening Institute

Deep Listening Institute (DLI) promotes the music and Deep Listening practice of pioneer composer Pauline Oliveros, providing a unique approach to music, literature, art, meditation, technology and healing. DLI fosters creative innovation across boundaries and across abilities, among artists and audience, musicians and non-musicians, healers and the physically or cognitively challenged, and children of all ages. This ever-growing community of musicians, artists, scientists and certified Deep Listening practitioners strives for a heightened consciousness of the world of sound and the sound of the world.

Tom Service’s Guide to the Music of Pauline Oliveros (2012) Guardian UK

Kamelmauz – Requiem No. 1b

Silver Palace Queue #1 (work-in-progress)
Silver Palace Queue #1
(work-in-progress)

Surprising myself, I fired up some synthesizers, designed a sequence, and let ‘er fly. My purpose was to track a musical sketch as the background for a short video showing me working on photographing still lifes in the backyard studio. What I came up with was terrible, in the (so-called) ‘last analysis.’ Yet, while producing, I spotted a folder with some tracks set down in 2015.

I relistened to the older tracks and stitched together this demo, and uploaded it to the Kamelmauz endless album.

ambient orchestral drone, sequenced and improvised on an iPad, tracked into Logic.

So, I Met This Guy. . .

Above are roots. . .recovering today the crucial elements of wash and noise.

Friday I was trying to see a piece of art at an opening here in Cleveland, and, I really mean trying to see it, thus trying to look into and through and around and right at map and territory.

A young man walked up to me and asked me what I thought, or something like that, and I was hesitant, asked if he was (perhaps,) the artist, and, I thought he told me he was not the artist. He wondered if speaking in response to the artist’s question might mean I would give the artist something less than my ‘unfettered viewpoint.”

At the time I didn’t get into the answer. It starts with me stating, “I like to know when the artist is asking, versus anybody else.” As an artist, in the engagement with the viewer, I’d like to work my way to the unfettered response, and work all the way to the deeply intentional response. So, as a viewer I prefer to proceed in the same manner.

As it turned out, throughout are conversation, I didn’t catch on to the fact that this gentlemen was the artist! Nevertheless, when I happened to mention that I too was an artist, and that my art was more influenced by music than it was by art, he affirmed this was true for him too!

But I remained unable in the real time of our all too brief, yet compelling conversation, to connect up two simple dots.

Coda.

The next day I wound my way from his musical name, Machine Listener, to his artist’s web site. Matthew Gallagher

After going through some of his audio opus–it was the background in my studio yesterday, and, then reading an interview and reading what he has to say, I could only end up for the first time in over two years wondering about musical collaboration. I’m thirty-five years older, yet the overlap in interests and concerns is apparently a very deep pool.

Matthew’s Soundcloud is full of sharp experiments. This track stood out.

Reverb and Patterns

Cistern from Claudia Esslinger on Vimeo.

The Old School II (2016)
The Old School II (2016)

My art and image making have gobbled all my creative time for a year. (This puts the couple of hundred or so hours of recording activity in 2014 in bittersweet relief.) At the moment the only way to join the two creative urges are to contemplate their meta-integration at the one counterintuitive spot that a bridge is possible.

The bridge, existing right now as a vague complex archetype, integrates reverberation and symmetric pattern.

This Kamelmauz track from 2014 captures what I’m dreaming.

Piscina Mirabilis – Salvatore Carannante in Spare Parts Sound Project. from Salvatore Carannante on Vimeo.

Last year the blog visited The Tank
“:

Zimoun «Sculpting Sound» : The Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, USA, 2011/2012 from ZIMOUN on Vimeo.

musical table & pendulum sound machine live at pola museum annex from kyouei design on Vimeo.

Aspiration and Visualization from kevinballon on Vimeo.

Kamelmauz envisions this bridge in 2012:

Lesley Flanagan – my music all comes from the same process of throwing down a palette of sounds and then intuitively organizing them

Lesley Flanagan, singer, composer, instrument builder, sound conceptualizer, deep listener

4. How could we make sound improve our lives?

I think it’s about listening. I feel that when we take time to truly listen — to actively engage in listening to another person, to music, to sounds in nature and in cities, to all the many sounds in world around us — we give ourselves time to be present in our lives. That’s very meaningful to me.

Five Sound Questions to Lesley Flanagan – via everydaylistening.com

Interview at Disquiet

The Speaker Is Present – A Conversation With Lesley Flanagan (2016)

Lesley Flanagan Recordings at Bandcamp

Peter Kirn – performance and the space, time, sound continuum

A Festival to Ponder the Nature of Time

From Create Digital Music, and right up my alley; although nowadays I am more observer than participant. Right up yours too if you are concerned at all with future music, performance, experimentation, field recordings, and the integration of sound with other modes and domains.

Robert Rich Live in Colorado

Robert Rich

We’re slowly closing in on the two year mark for legal marijuana here in Colorado. If there’s a couple of things we’ve all learned from the last two years, it’s that recreational cannabis doesn’t have apocalyptic effects, and that regardless of the label as “medicinal” or “recreational,” you can’t negate the beneficial effects that marijuana can have on people suffering from a variety of ailments. It’s important as a recreational user or a medicinal patient to know what strains are going to affect you in what ways. Dope Directory Marijuana Strain Review